Book Review: Good Omens by Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman

“It may help to understand human affairs to be clear that most of the great triumphs and tragedies of history are caused, not by people being fundamentally good or fundamentally bad, but by people being fundamentally people.”

It takes a special kind of humor to make me laugh. This is that special kind. Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman make a fantastic team, and their humor is music to my soul. Even though I loved almost every word they put to paper, I am still aware of the fact that this book might not be everyone’s cup of tea. Especially those who take themselves and the world around them way too seriously. Which is like 90% of the people on the Internet these days.

“Over the years Crowley had found it increasingly difficult to find anything demonic to do which showed up against the natural background of generalized nastiness. There had been times, over the past millennium, when he’d felt like sending a message back Below saying, Look we may as well give up right now, we might as well shut down Dis and Pandemonium and everywhere and move up here, there’s nothing we can do to them that they don’t do to themselves and they do things we’ve never even thought of, often involving electrodes. They’ve got what we lack. They’ve got imagination. And electricity, of course. One of them had written it, hadn’t he…”Hell is empty, and all the devils are here.” …”

Of course, there’s more to Good Omens than just humor, than just the idea that a demon and an angel would try to save the world from ending, there’s a lot more than that. Underneath it all, there are themes that could only be explained through jokes. The kinds that deal with good and evil, and how difficult they are to differentiate properly, about religion, about human nature, about how ironic life is.

A wonderful, wonderful book. I can’t recommend it enough. Must read! If only for the purpose of laughing for a few good hours or so.

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11 thoughts on “Book Review: Good Omens by Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman

  1. Agree completely. One of my favorite reads – it’s especially fun to listen to as an audiobook while driving. I’m sure you can picture why I’d think that while sitting in traffic…

  2. “Most people meeting Aziraphael formed three impressions: that he was English, that he was intelligent, and that he was gayer than a treeful of monkeys on nitrous oxide.”
    It ain’t many authors with the gift for a turn of phrase that can stick in the mind so well–and still leave me in stitches years later.
    GNU Terry Pratchett.

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