The angel in the marble…

angel“I saw the angel in the marble and carved until I set him free.” – Michelangelo

Don’t you love it when your mind imprisons a certain image? You have a certain vision, you know exactly where you want to go and what you have to do. An image that has to be set free.

This is one of the most crucial aspects of good art: vision. And heart. I’m not sure you can have one without the other. Continue reading

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TMM: The most important things

“The most important things are the hardest to say. They are the things you get ashamed of, because words diminish them — words shrink things that seemed limitless when they were in your head to no more than living size when they’re brought out. But it’s more than that, isn’t it? The most important things lie too close to wherever your secret heart is buried, like landmarks to a treasure your enemies would love to steal away. And you may make revelations that cost you dearly only to have people look at you in a funny way, not understanding what you’ve said at all, or why you thought it was so important that you almost cried while you were saying it. That’s the worst, I think. When the secret stays locked within not for want of a teller but for want of an understanding ear.” – Stephen King

I remember each and every single time words failed me, because it doesn’t happen so often. The bitter moments when I needed them the most, when I struggled to express what I felt and what I wanted, and most times nothing but silence came out. Other times, tears.

The thing is, words do diminish the meaning of those words we hold closest to our souls, the words that could either make us or break us, the words that define who we are or what it is we’re feeling at any given moment. Maybe we are afraid that the words won’t mean as much to the person we’re telling them to, maybe it is because they mean a lot more to us then they could possibly mean to someone else.

And, in the end, the sad truth is that it’s not the words or how we say them that truly matters, but who we’re telling those words to.

You’re no Leonardo DaVinci and that’s okay

I was doing a bit of research into Pablo Picasso for the showcase of his earliest works, and I read that he created some fifty thousand works during his life. Fifty thousand. If you were to do one per day, it would take you some 136 years. A hundred and thirty six years…

Do you understand the level of commitment that is required of one if he desires to become phenomenal? One of the best? To be considered a genius by his peers? You literally have to break yourself in half. To be so obsessed about whatever it is you’re doing that you end up sacrificing a lot of other stuff.

Yes, you can have anything you want, but you’ll have to give up on (almost) everything else to get it.

Now, Leonardo DaVinci.

Areas of interest: invention, painting, sculpting, architecture, science, music, mathematics, engineering, literature, anatomy, geology, astronomy, botany, writing, history, and cartography. The father of paleontology, ichnology, and architecture. One of the greatest painters of all time. Credited with the invention of technology we never properly developed until hundreds of years after his death, such as the helicopter, the parachute, or the tank. Continue reading

TMM: 13 Writing Tips from Chuck Palahniuk

Rules, advice, tips and tricks. They are all important to any creative individual. The guideline. The cardboard box. There to show you what keeps other individuals inspired and motivated and hungry. Also there to let you know that some rules can be bent or broken or ignored.

Here you can find 13 Writing Tips from the author of Fight Club.

Great artists steal

“Sometimes the simple rhythm of typing gets us from page one to page two. When you begin to feel your own words, start typing them.” – Finding Forrester

Art is a selfish endeavor. The words we write for ourselves are always the ones who matter most to everyone around us. The words that strip our soul naked. The words that we’d like to burn the moment they find a home on a piece of paper. The words that we can barely read aloud.

But what happens when someone else writes the words you wished to have written? Words that you couldn’t have written, but you didn’t. Words that describe the shape of your heart as perfectly as such flawed instruments can do?

Quite the dilemma. Continue reading

(Dis)comfort

“The poet’s, the writer’s, duty is to write about these things. It is his privilege to help man endure by lifting his heart, by reminding him of the courage and honor and hope and pride and compassion and pity and sacrifice which have been the glory of his past.” – William Faulkner

Nothing is as beautiful as we can imagine it. Yet, there would be nothing unless we’d imagine it first.

That’s the thing… the constant aspiration towards what doesn’t exist…yet.

Frustrating, indeed.

We are who we are because we spend most of our time dreaming of becoming much, much more.

And art has the habit of showing us what is possible. Continue reading

Flow

flow

“When I am in my painting, I am not aware of what I’m doing. It is only after a short of ‘get acquainted’ period that I see what I have been about. I have no fears about making changes, destroying the image, etc., because the painting has a life of its own. I try to let it come through. It is only when I lose contact with the painting that the result is a mess. Otherwise there is pure harmony, an easy give and take, and the painting comes out well.” – Jackson Pollock

Being self-conscious about one’s process is the death of one’s art. Good artists don’t know what they do when they do good stuff, great artists don’t even bother to understand this process. Continue reading