Book Review: Dune by Frank Herbert

Even though I wrote an article on why this novel is so difficult to adapt into a movie, I didn’t review the novel. It’s time to do just that now.

Few novels have exerted such a tremendous influence on me. Frank Herbert’s masterpiece, and undeniably one of the very best SciFi novels ever written, takes a life of its own over the span of the first few pages.

The universe the story is set in is complex — a vast intergalactic empire working as an intricate mechanism, a lasting feud, and all the treacherous games that are a part of the never ending struggle for power among the powerful.
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Book Review: Survivor by Chuck Palahniuk

Palahniuk managed to amaze me with this novel. I’ve read it in a single night, as most of his other books, but this one was shockingly good, more than his usual standard. He increases the intensity of the novel with such finesse that when you reach the end, it feels as if you’ve gotten out of a roller coaster ride(no way of avoiding a terrible cliche here.) Continue reading

Book Review: Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury

My way of telling a good book and a great book apart is by measuring the time it takes me to read them. And Fahrenheit 451 is a page turner. It took me less than a day to read it, and as I read I kept telling myself that it’s one of those rare instances of a real prophecy. Even though this is not yet the future Bradbury envisioned, we’re close to what he imagined in his novel. Continue reading

Book Review: Fight Club by Chuck Palahniuk

Chuck Palahniuk is one of my favorite writers. His style is unmistakable, his characters are brilliant, and at times, his writing is flawless.

And Fight Club is one of his best works so far. His debut novel, rejected countless times because it was too gory, like all of Palahniuk’s other novels, is a satire of the modern world. Continue reading

Book Review: The History of Love by Nicole Krauss

Nicole Krauss is one of the best young American writers. She has been featured in the New Yorker and other prestigious literary magazines, and she’s also Jonathan Safran Foer’s wife, the new Wunderkind of American Literature.

The History of Love is her second novel, and it follows the life of Leo Gursky, an elderly man who lives all alone – a very pathetic and senseless life. Basically he just wants to die. The beauty in all this lies in the fact that Gursky once wrote a novel for the woman he loved. The History of Love. So, yes, this is meta-fiction, and it’s one of the very best novels of this type I’ve encountered. Continue reading

Book Review: The Garden of Eden by Ernest Hemingway

The Garden of Eden, unfinished as it is, is one of my favorite novels, and undoubtedly stands proof of Hemingway’s most enduring of traits; he was not only capable of, but also willing to reinvent his writing, always aspiring for a different style.

Much like The Old Man and The Sea, this novel is different from his earlier works. And it shows a different layer, more human, to one of the great “macho” writers in history.

Taking place on the Côte d’Azur in the 1920s, the story is as follows: a young American writer, David Bourne, and his wife, Catherine, are happy and in love, and to some extent, the opening chapters are a clear reflection of the title itself. Continue reading

Book Review: East of Eden by John Steinbeck

One of my many ways to judge a book is by keeping track of how much time it takes me to read it. Of course, it’s a flawed system, but it does give a sense of value to a book, it underlines strong elements in a novel.

East of Eden took me one day to read. Yes, just one day. And this isn’t a short novel. It stands at over 600 pages long, and yet I couldn’t stop reading. This happens on rare occasions. I’m usually too restless to read for more than one or two hours, but in the case of this novel… Continue reading