(Dis)comfort

“The poet’s, the writer’s, duty is to write about these things. It is his privilege to help man endure by lifting his heart, by reminding him of the courage and honor and hope and pride and compassion and pity and sacrifice which have been the glory of his past.” – William Faulkner

Nothing is as beautiful as we can imagine it. Yet, there would be nothing unless we’d imagine it first.

That’s the thing… the constant aspiration towards what doesn’t exist…yet.

Frustrating, indeed.

We are who we are because we spend most of our time dreaming of becoming much, much more.

And art has the habit of showing us what is possible.

Art asks the question: “What else is there?”

What else is there for us?

What more can we gain from life? From ourselves? From others?

Also, art gives us hope.

We are not unique… our worries and troubles and feelings are not that special…

Others have been where we are, others have struggled with the same issues, others have conquered the same demons.

There’s a great deal of value in that. Far more than we are willing to accept.

Psychologists claim that listening to music is the only activity that engages the entire brain.

Stendhal Syndrome, where a person is so impressed by a work of art, that it provokes faints and such.

Imagine that.

Art is beauty, and you know what they say about beauty…

Beauty will save the world.

Sooner or later.

Whether we want it to or not.

Advertisements

Avoiding reality… and why it’s so popular

From Game of Thrones to the trend of vampire novels, post-apocaliptic stories, hard sci-fi, cyberpunk, steampunk and all other genres, we’ve fast become addicted to science fiction, fantasy, and horror.
Why?

Why such a departure from what “normal” looks like?

Maybe because normal kinda sucks?

Maybe because almost every specie on this planet dreams for the purpose of avoiding reality? Of filtering the stress dealt to its central nervous system during the day?

Maybe we want to escape normal…

Maybe we all secretly(or not so) wish to live in an entirely different world than the one we live in.

Maybe…

Maybe we hate the rules that keep this universe in place and wish to live in one ruled by different laws.

Or maybe we want to be different.

Super heroes.

We wish for greatness…

Eternal life?

Super human speed, strength, endurance?

What else?

A simpler world?

One without all this technology and stuff?

Post-apocaliptic?

The world after the end of the world resembles the one at the very beginning in a lot of ways.

Art is all about wishes.

Of course, wishing for something does not make it so.

But that never stopped us anyway.

It’s not at all about midnights

Some people like to write late at night. When they’re all by themselves. When there’s nothing but silence. Utter silence. Heartbreakingly quiet.
Others like to write early in the morning.

Or mid afternoon. At a crowded cafe.

Or on a bus. Scribbling on a notepad.

This is not about the different habits, this is about the fact that habits are just that: stuff you get used to doing to such an extent that you cannot imagine it doing any other way.

But of course you can.

It’s not the ritual, it’s you.

It’s not magic, it’s just work.

Makes it easier to produce stuff. Whether it’s midnight or five in the morning.

It doesn’t matter.

It’s just words. Or paint on canvas. Or notes. Or flashing images. Some moving parts. A piece of marble…

It’s not about the hour or the place or the temperature of the room or how many people are in said room.

It’s not about the tools you use or the number of people waiting for said piece of art.

It’s not about how much you get paid. Or about being paid anything at all.

It’s not about the idea.

It’s about the execution. About what you are wiling to do.

About the time and effort…

Because this is what this world is truly all about: will power.

TMM

TMM – The Midnight Muse. A series of posts about inspiration, the creative process, and finding the courage to create, regardless of what or how you are feeling.
Apparently, there’s a clear link between memory and imagination. The better memory you have, the more imaginative you are as a person.

All art is born out of chaos. It is a person’s way to create order out of said chaos. It is a million different thoughts and ideas and feelings and memories strawn together to form something that wasn’t there before.

The muse is born out of this chaos… out of a plethora of experiences. Too much knowledge for one person to handle. Your hard drive must be full.

That is what must happen for you to create.

All art is born out of chaos. The neverending battle between what we know and what he have yet to know, about what we feel and what we would like not to feel, about what we have and what we wish we had, about who we are and who we desire to be.

The first rockstar


Psychologists believe narcissists to be more creative than other people.

Narcissists are better artists.

And there probably never was and never will be a more narcisssistic person than Oscar Wilde.

Yup. The first rockstar was a writer.

Someone who declared upon entering the United States that he had nothing else to declare but his own genius.

Someone who wrote his own version of the myth of Narcissus.

But this isn’t a critique. No, by no means. This is just a way of explaining the following: you’ve got to reach a certain point of self-absorbtion, in order to create art. Why? Because that’s the only way to shut up the inner critic. The only way to not care about what other people think or say or do in relation to your art.

Haters gonna hate, right?

All art is a selfish endeavor.

The muse

 

It’s been a long time since I wrote a post in this series. I do not write that late at night anymore. I go to sleep way sooner than midnight nowadays.

But I do find that inspiration has no schedule.

To those of you who have no muse today, tonight, tomorrow: wait. Do not worry, for it does nothing but hinder your inspiration and ability to concentrate.

To those who have found your muse: use it. Abuse it. Have fun. Enjoy.

To all the rest: I have no idea what you’re doing here, on this blog.

Superheroes

DeathofsupermanI “created” my first superhero when I was five years old. His name was Captain Hank, and he possessed super-human strength, speed, and he couldn’t age. That was all, basically.

Then, of course, I had to make some villains, and then some other superheroes to aid Hank in his fight against evil.

To some, the concept of  superheroes acts simply as a metaphor for greatness. It can be easily understood by almost anyone, regardless of age, education, culture, and so on. I never actually agreed with this definition.

I believe the concept itself is so primordial that most of us actually miss the point. My definition is that superheroes are characters who possess certain abilities and traits that make them better than normal people in many ways.

But they also have flaws and weaknesses, and they make mistakes. Continue reading