10 Reasons why you should read a young adult novel – The Fault in Our Stars by John Green

The young adult genre is not only about vampires, warewolves, or some other strange creatures. Sometimes, you get to read novels like Looking for Alaska, or The Perks of Being a Wallflower. Novels that are centered around the theme of growing up, about what it truly means to be a teenager, to make friends, to try to fit in or stand out.

 

This post is sort of a two in one special, meaning that, well, you’ll see.

The Fault in Our Stars

Despite the tumor-shrinking medical miracle that has bought her a few years, Hazel has never been anything but terminal, her final chapter inscribed upon diagnosis. But when a gorgeous plot twist named Augustus Waters suddenly appears at Cancer Kid Support Group, Hazel’s story is about to be completely rewritten.

So, ten reasons why you should be reading The Fault in Our Stars by John Green: Continue reading

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Book Review: The City and the Stars by Arthur C. Clarke

Diaspar is a city inhabited by 20 million people. In Diaspar there are no days and nights, only afternoons. No one sleeps. People are born by a computer that controls absolutely everything, and a life cycle lasts a thousand years. People are young until the day they day.

Diaspar is the last city on Earth that survives the passage of time, a place in which the laws of life and death are not applicable. Continue reading

Book Review: Survivor by Chuck Palahniuk

Palahniuk managed to amaze me with this novel. I’ve read it in a single night, as most of his other books, but this one was shockingly good, more than his usual standard. He increases the intensity of the novel with such finesse that when you reach the end, it feels as if you’ve gotten out of a roller coaster ride(no way of avoiding a terrible cliche here.) Continue reading

Book Review: Good Omens by Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman

“It may help to understand human affairs to be clear that most of the great triumphs and tragedies of history are caused, not by people being fundamentally good or fundamentally bad, but by people being fundamentally people.”

It takes a special kind of humor to make me laugh. This is that special kind. Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman make a fantastic team, and their humor is music to my soul. Even though I loved almost every word they put to paper, I am still aware of the fact that this book might not be everyone’s cup of tea. Especially those who take themselves and the world around them way too seriously. Which is like 90% of the people on the Internet these days.

“Over the years Crowley had found it increasingly difficult to find anything demonic to do which showed up against the natural background of generalized nastiness. There had been times, over the past millennium, when he’d felt like sending a message back Below saying, Look we may as well give up right now, we might as well shut down Dis and Pandemonium and everywhere and move up here, there’s nothing we can do to them that they don’t do to themselves and they do things we’ve never even thought of, often involving electrodes. They’ve got what we lack. They’ve got imagination. And electricity, of course. One of them had written it, hadn’t he…”Hell is empty, and all the devils are here.” …”

Continue reading

Book Review: Hyperion by Dan Simmons

One word review: Wow!

Ever so often it happens that I get to suspend disbelief and immerse myself in such a brilliantly constructed fictional universe that it feels like a dream I’d never want to end.

Yes. I did not want to wake up from this.

I’m still book hangover. I am currently reading the sequel.

Hyperion by Dan Simmons is a brilliant SF novel. The world is complex, intriguing, and believable. It tells of certain aspects of humanity that should/could be enhanced as we develop our technology.

This is also a great novel in terms of storytelling. The writing does its job. Each character has its own way of describing events, certain motivations and dreams and hopes and aspirations. Continue reading

Book Review: Diary by Chuck Palahniuk

Without a doubt Chuck Palahniuk is the literary equivalent of a method actor. He meticulously researches his books.

But this novel is different. This one’s about the artistic process, one I think this author is both familiar with and also terribly good at explaining it.

Diary is the story of Misty Wilmot, a waitress. Yeah, she was once a promising painter, but now she’s just there, not dead yet, but not quite alive either. But when her husband tries to kill himself (and fails), she finds out that she hasn’t yet lost her talent. That’s basically the premise of this story. More or less. Yeah, there’s a plot twist towards the end, ’cause that’s Chuck’s specialty. And yeah, we’ve got strange characters doing strange things in a strange world. Continue reading

Book Review: We the Animals by Justin Torres

When it comes to things that have a price tag attached to them, literature being no exception, there are certain trends that come and go. In commercial fiction, this trend might be vampires one day and zombies the other. In “real fiction”; what some people call literary fiction, there’s the trend of the autobiographical novel. Part fiction, part truth, these novels appeal to most of the best young novelists out there.

We the Animals is no exception. Continue reading