Book Review: Disgrace by J.M. Coetzee

At fifty-two, Professor David Lurie is divorced, filled with desire, but lacking in passion. When an affair with a student leaves him jobless, shunned by friends, and ridiculed by his ex-wife, he retreats to his daughter Lucy’s smallholding. David’s visit becomes an extended stay as he attempts to find meaning in his one remaining relationship. Instead, an incident of unimaginable terror and violence forces father and daughter to confront their strained relationship and the equally complicated racial complexities of the new South Africa.

Published in 1999, John Maxwell Coetzee’s Disgrace was awarded the Booker Prize. Also, four years after the release of what is, arguably, his best known novel, Coetzee was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature. Continue reading


Book Review: The Woman with the Bouquet by Eric-Emmanuel Schmitt

In his new collection of stories, Eric-Emmanuel Schmitt, author of The Most Beautiful Book in the World, probes the paradox that the events that shape our lives are often the stuff of dreams, yet nonetheless true. Humor, tenderness, irony, and exquisite writing have always been the hallmarks of Schmitt’s work. Here, he adds a pinch of philosophy.

In one story, a lovelorn writer seeks refuge in Ostende, a remote and charming town on the North Sea. His host is a solitary and eccentric octogenarian. The fairy-tale setting starts to work its magic and the old woman begins to tell her tale—an extraordinary story of passion. Bewitched by what he hears, the writer can no longer distinguish what is real from what is not, and in the woman’s account he will finally find a response to his own deep-seated grief. Here, as in the other stories in this collection, Schmitt displays the combination of stylishness and insight into the human condition that prompted Kirkus Reviews to write of his tales that they “echo Maupassant’s with their lean narratives, surprise endings, mordant humor and psychological acuity.”

It is said that there’s no creature that does not try to escape reality. There isn’t a living thing endowed with a central nervous system that does not dream. The brain is what is called an exclusion system: its purpose is to decide what information is important and what is not. There is so much information in the world that we’d go mad if we tried to understand it all.

What does this have to do with this collection of short stories?

Well, because the characters in each of the stories have this in common: they want to escape reality, they are looking for a shelter against it. If you ever felt this gnawing sense of fear at the thought that you are simply waiting for life to happen to you, if you daydreamed to the point of it becoming an obsession, then this is the book for you.


Reality cannot be negotiated with, but our imagination can be bargained with; our dreams can show us a world that will never come true.

But that never stopped us from dreaming and wishing our dreams would, somehow, come true.

The Woman with the Bouquet is one of the most intriguing compilations of short stories I have ever read.


Book Review: Under the Dome by Stephen King

Stephen King does love to write big books. The kind of books that make even the most voracious of readers a bit anxious. On the other hand, over the span of hundreds and hundreds of pages, the King creates such a universe that you get immersed into it to such an extent that you become emotionally attached to the characters, the way they think, the way they talk. The story becomes an alternate reality, the characters your friends.

The same thing happens when reading Under the Dome. One of the most interesting novels about the way the human psyche changes when put under pressure, a novel about the crumbling state of the human condition when the rules that keep society into place break apart. Continue reading


The Great Gatsby

Some of you know that The Great Gatsby is my favorite novel. I read it once a year. Like a sort of pilgrimage.

I won’t say The Great Gatsby is the best novel ever written. I don’t think such a thing exists. Instead, I believe there are a few novels out there that are perfect.

My definition of perfect is the following: a story where a balance has been established. There’s nothing to be taken away, nothing to be added. I’d list a number of such stories, like The Turn of the Screw by Henry James and The Invention of Morel by Adolfo Bioy Casares.

Anyway, in the end it all comes down to personal taste. And culture, and education, and the type of books you enjoy reading, and a bunch of other stuff. Some people might hate The Great Gatsby for the same reasons I love it.

Now, let’s get to the actual review.

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Book Review: Ancient Book of Sex and Science

In this second volume in the critically acclaimed Ancient Book series, indulge yourself as you explore the strange frontiers of sex and science. From instruments of innovation and the Atomic Age to analysis of the mind, body, and seduction of the human form. Featuring broad color, shapely design, supple lines, and evocative commentary, The Ancient Book of Sex and Science is a fine art hardcover collection of images produced by some of the most highly sophisticated animation designers and low-brow artists in the industry.

This is a phenomenal book for all art aficionados. A must-have.  Continue reading


Book Review: The It-Doesn’t-Matter Suit by Sylvia Plath

A children’s story by Sylvia Plath which was found in manuscript form after her death. Max Nix lives with his mama and papa and six brothers in a small village called Winkelburg. Max longs for a suit – not just a workaday suit, but one for doing everything. One day, a mysterious parcel arrives.

Her journals indicate it was written before the birth of her first child, Frieda, back in 1959, it wasn’t until 1996 that the tale saw the light of day with its first — and only — publication, featuring wonderful illustrations by German graphic designer and artist Rotraut Susanne Berner.

I believe that children’s stories are the most difficult to write. There are children’s stories that are, in essence, philosophical treatises, and adults would have a lot to learn by reading them. Continue reading


Book Review: Christ Recrucified by Nikos Kazantzakis

The inhabitants of a Greek village, ruled by the Turks, plan to enact the life of Christ in a mystery play but are overwhelmed by their task. A group of refugees, fleeing from the ruins of their plundered homes, arrive asking for protection – and suddenly the drama of the Passion becomes reality.

This could easily be a very short review. There are only two novels that made my cry my heart out. The History of Love and this one. By cry my heart out I mean I had to stop reading because I couldn’t read anymore, my vision was blurry because of the tears in my eyes. That kind of good, that kind of wonderful writing.

I believe that Christ Recrucified is is not so much a religious novel, but more about human nature. What happens to us does not create us, only reveals our inner most selves. It is a novel about greed and envy and how distorted our perceptions of reality, of morality, and our own self-conduct can become because of that.

No matter what you believe in, I highly recommend reading this novel. It might make you understand suffering a bit better, how a true dark night of the soul, and how blessed we are to be living in the kind of society that we live in right now. Continue reading