The first rockstar


Psychologists believe narcissists to be more creative than other people.

Narcissists are better artists.

And there probably never was and never will be a more narcisssistic person than Oscar Wilde.

Yup. The first rockstar was a writer.

Someone who declared upon entering the United States that he had nothing else to declare but his own genius.

Someone who wrote his own version of the myth of Narcissus.

But this isn’t a critique. No, by no means. This is just a way of explaining the following: you’ve got to reach a certain point of self-absorbtion, in order to create art. Why? Because that’s the only way to shut up the inner critic. The only way to not care about what other people think or say or do in relation to your art.

Haters gonna hate, right?

All art is a selfish endeavor.

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Superheroes

DeathofsupermanI “created” my first superhero when I was five years old. His name was Captain Hank, and he possessed super-human strength, speed, and he couldn’t age. That was all, basically.

Then, of course, I had to make some villains, and then some other superheroes to aid Hank in his fight against evil.

To some, the concept of  superheroes acts simply as a metaphor for greatness. It can be easily understood by almost anyone, regardless of age, education, culture, and so on. I never actually agreed with this definition.

I believe the concept itself is so primordial that most of us actually miss the point. My definition is that superheroes are characters who possess certain abilities and traits that make them better than normal people in many ways.

But they also have flaws and weaknesses, and they make mistakes. Continue reading

American Gods: The TV Show

“I miss you’, he admitted.
‘I’m here’, she said.
‘That’s when I miss you most. When you’re here. When you aren’t here, when you’re just a ghost of the past or a dream from another life, it’s easier then.”
Neil Gaiman, American Gods

Everything you imagine is real.

No, this is not some law of attraction bullshit, the ever increasing mantra of the self-help gurus of the world. This is the basis of the universe created by Neil Gaiman.

Gods are real, because people believe in them.

Faith is the one force on Earth capable of shaping the world.

Interesting, huh?

American Gods, the TV show, uses this equation as a driving force for its narrative. One that is beginning to unravel its mysteries. Slowly. Painfully slow.

But this is, by no means, a boring show. Quite the contrary.

For a story that shows a Mexican Jesus at one point, or a genie driving a cab through New York, American Gods makes a bold statement: change is the only constant of the Universe. And gods, too, have to change.

The age old battle of good versus evil is replace by old versus new. How certain elements will always try to fight back change, fight back what most consider as evolution.

American Gods tells the story of a world that doesn’t make sense to anyone except the believer.

And it does turn you into one fairly easily.

No time

Believe it or not, the idea for this project started in the autumn of 2012. Had this idea of an online magazine dedicated to promoting aspiring artists. Indie stuff. I had a small team, struggled to raise the funds needed, and then…

I failed.

I couldn’t find the time to write articles, I struggled to engage people like it happened on my main blog.

After a few months, I tried again. And again. And again at various points for the next few years. I changed platforms, I gave up on the idea of a digital magazine. Gave up on the idea of an app.

It is what it is. Continue reading