Metafiction

“We’re all searching for something in our art. There are questions, and we always feel close to finding the answers, but we never do.

Artists never create art for what they might find. Some want to free themselves from nightmares, others want to inspire, or raise questions, or make people understand the world around them. Some want to entertain, others want to get rich, but it seems to me that no matter our reason for choosing to become artists, we all find more happiness in the stories or paintings or songs we create than we find in the real world. This is the sad truth: artists choose to live with one eye always closed to the world, the here and the now, and use that awareness to see what others can’t.

Inside the artist’s soul there is always a part that feels no remorse or fear when it comes to all that is dark in human nature. It seems to me that a part of the artist’s soul gets damaged to such an extent that it grows impervious to pain, heat, or cold. Like a scar.” Continue reading

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Book Review: A Knight of Seven Kingdoms by George R.R. Martin

Taking place a hundred years before the events in the Game of Thrones, A Knight of Seven Kingdoms adds a bit more to the incredibly complex universe imagined by George R.R. Martin.

Dunk and Egg are as unlikely a duo as some of the most popular duos of the main series. Also, it is a welcome change to read about a world ruled by the Targaryens. A world at the crossroads of being changed forever. Continue reading

Book Review: Scarred Hearts by Max Blecher

Scarred Hearts, one of the few published works by Max Blecher, is a novel of pain and suffering. The author, who lived most of his life under the auspices of a dreadful disease, died at the age of 29. But even though this is a novel in which the characters live under the constant threat of death, even though their lives are bitter and painful, his little characters find enough strength to fall in love, to mold the most human of feelings and experiences after their own needs. Continue reading

Book Review: The Dream of Heroes by Adolfo Bioy Casares

Even though The Dream of Heroes is far from the quality of The Invention of Morel, Adolfo Bioy Casares’ best work, it has a certain allure, based both on the style and on the plot itself, that qualifies this novel as one of the finest works of art.

The story itself is quite simple. At a carnival in 1927, Emilio Gauna gets drunk with some of his friends. At which point there’s a sequence of hazy events that he almost forgets entirely, except for a masked woman. This strange apparition makes Gauna want to try to see her again. So three years later, he’s recreating the events of that night, in an attempt to meet with the strange woman again. Continue reading

Book Review: We the Animals by Justin Torres

When it comes to things that have a price tag attached to them, literature being no exception, there are certain trends that come and go. In commercial fiction, this trend might be vampires one day and zombies the other. In “real fiction”; what some people call literary fiction, there’s the trend of the autobiographical novel. Part fiction, part truth, these novels appeal to most of the best young novelists out there.

We the Animals is no exception. Continue reading