TMM: Write to write

“Write to write. Write because you need to write. Write to settle the rage within you. Write with an internal purpose. Write about something or someone that means so much to you, that you don’t care what others think.”Nick Miller

There are a million different reasons to write something. The narcissistic belief that what you have to say is important to others, the selfless ideal of helping save this world through art and beauty…

Fame. Money. Love.

Heartbreak. Depression. Solitude.

All of them are important reasons.

But there’s something about writing just to write, writing to get the words out of your head…

Writing because that’s what you do. Writing because you won’t have it any other way.

If you feel strongly about something, then you can write about it.

All you have to do is silence all the other voices that keep telling you stuff like people won’t like it (who cares?) or it won’t sell(again, who cares?) or it’s been done before(everything’s been done before, or so it seems until something new comes along).

Just write. Type those damn words. There will come a day when you’ll be thankful for that.

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TMM: Artistically bankrupt

Artistically bankrupt. Also known as writer’s block for writers, screenwriters, and poets. Also known as having no clue what to do for painters, singers, dancers, etc.

What can you do about it? I mean, you stare at a blank page for so long that your head gets dizzy and still nothing good happens. You may write a few sentences but soon delete them.

Well.. just stop. Yeah, stop. No, no, I mean it. Stop. Now, go out and live life. I know it sounds like a scary thing to do, but you must. It’s for your art. Go out there and live. Meet new people, do exciting stuff. Fall in love, be a douchebag, get dumped, get your heart broken, then write about that. Or sing about it. Or paint your pain away.

This is the thing.

Consuming art is a way to escape reality.

Creating art is a way to recreate reality, give it a different meaning, or simply immortalize it.

Regardless, you must spend some time in this world, in the real world, doing stuff, for this whole artist thing to work.

Sorry, there’s no way to go around it.

So go out there and have fun. Or at least try to.

Metafiction

“We’re all searching for something in our art. There are questions, and we always feel close to finding the answers, but we never do.

Artists never create art for what they might find. Some want to free themselves from nightmares, others want to inspire, or raise questions, or make people understand the world around them. Some want to entertain, others want to get rich, but it seems to me that no matter our reason for choosing to become artists, we all find more happiness in the stories or paintings or songs we create than we find in the real world. This is the sad truth: artists choose to live with one eye always closed to the world, the here and the now, and use that awareness to see what others can’t.

Inside the artist’s soul there is always a part that feels no remorse or fear when it comes to all that is dark in human nature. It seems to me that a part of the artist’s soul gets damaged to such an extent that it grows impervious to pain, heat, or cold. Like a scar.” Continue reading

Happy endings…

happy_endings“If you want a happy ending, that depends, of course, on where you stop your story.” Orson Welles

Sometimes when I write I think too much. I worry about things I shouldn’t worry about, and I write as if I’ve got something to prove to someone. That’s a mistake. Over thinking, trying to outsmart the reader only to outsmart yourself.

When I wrote Jazz I wanted for the ending to the story to deliver a certain message. Throughout the novel there’s some talk about happy endings, about what we want to get from life, and stuff like that. Of course, those characters are mistaken in their belief that happiness is a destination, but nevertheless… they want and try to reach for something, and they’re not even sure what that something is. Continue reading