Movies About Writers

 

Finding Forrester (2000)

In a way, I just couldn’t start with any other  movie, simply because Finding Forrester was so cute and sweet and sincere that I almost cried at the end.

Starring Sean Connery and his manly voice in the role of William Forrester, a very successful and yet reclusive writer, this movie actually has some pretty good advice on writing. Continue reading

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The Mummy, King Arthur, and why critics aren’t always right

The world of art is a strange one: some folks get paid to be haters. Let me rephrase that: some folks, who never held a brush or took it upon themselves to write a book or shoot a movie, get paid to be haters.

In any given field, you are required to walk the walk, so to speak, in order to be considered an expert.

Imagine some guy being considered an expert in quantum mechanics for reading Q&A’s on Quora. And a couple Wikipedia articles.

That being said, critics aren’t always right.

Why?

Because they belong to a group of people who like to take themselves way too seriously.

I watch a lot of movies. I read books. Listen to music. I even collect paintings and drawings. And I do all this with the sole purpose of entertaining myself. To amuse myself a bit. To escape reality. Sometimes art is just about that: makes you forget about yourself for a while, makes you see a bigger picture; so you don’t take yourself too seriously and end up shooting yourself in the head one fine morning.

That’s why critics fail at the most crucial aspect of art. Especially commercial art.

Take King Arthur, for instance. Classic Guy Ritchie. Fun, fast paced, enjoyable. A certain kind of cinematography. Witty dialogue. Bizarre characters.

And it delivers.

And it is a fun movie. Well worth watching because it’s entertaining.

Now, about the Mummy. A horror movie that is a lot less scary than it was supposed to be, I am sure. First hour, it’s fine. But then even Russell Crowe starts playing badly(and I’ve never seen him do that) and the whole thing becomes ridiculous.

Wanna know why that movie failed?

It wasn’t sure of itself, of what it was supposed to be doing and what its true message was.

What form of entertainment it was offering the audience.

That was all.

But critics always take themselves too seriously and try to demolish a movie for not being what they would have wanted it to be.

It’s like disowning your own child for becoming a writer instead of a doctor, as you’ve always wanted him to be.

Avoiding reality… and why it’s so popular

From Game of Thrones to the trend of vampire novels, post-apocaliptic stories, hard sci-fi, cyberpunk, steampunk and all other genres, we’ve fast become addicted to science fiction, fantasy, and horror.
Why?

Why such a departure from what “normal” looks like?

Maybe because normal kinda sucks?

Maybe because almost every specie on this planet dreams for the purpose of avoiding reality? Of filtering the stress dealt to its central nervous system during the day?

Maybe we want to escape normal…

Maybe we all secretly(or not so) wish to live in an entirely different world than the one we live in.

Maybe…

Maybe we hate the rules that keep this universe in place and wish to live in one ruled by different laws.

Or maybe we want to be different.

Super heroes.

We wish for greatness…

Eternal life?

Super human speed, strength, endurance?

What else?

A simpler world?

One without all this technology and stuff?

Post-apocaliptic?

The world after the end of the world resembles the one at the very beginning in a lot of ways.

Art is all about wishes.

Of course, wishing for something does not make it so.

But that never stopped us anyway.

Superheroes

DeathofsupermanI “created” my first superhero when I was five years old. His name was Captain Hank, and he possessed super-human strength, speed, and he couldn’t age. That was all, basically.

Then, of course, I had to make some villains, and then some other superheroes to aid Hank in his fight against evil.

To some, the concept of  superheroes acts simply as a metaphor for greatness. It can be easily understood by almost anyone, regardless of age, education, culture, and so on. I never actually agreed with this definition.

I believe the concept itself is so primordial that most of us actually miss the point. My definition is that superheroes are characters who possess certain abilities and traits that make them better than normal people in many ways.

But they also have flaws and weaknesses, and they make mistakes. Continue reading

The Hobbit: $37.5 million opening day

Peter Jackson’s latest movie, The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey, earned $37.5 million on Friday, the biggest opening day ever for a December release.

As a comparison, the highest opening day in the Lord of the Rings trilogy was $34.5 million for The Return of the King.

For this latest adaptation of one of J.R.R. Tolkien’s works, Warner Bros. estimated opening weekend earnings of $100 million.