Showcase: Sandro Botticelli

Alessandro di Mariano di Vanni Filipepi, known as Sandro Botticelli, was an Italian painter of the Early Renaissance.

Besides the mythological subjects which are his best known works, he also painted a wide range of religious subjects and some portraits.

He has been described as “an outsider in the mainstream of Italian painting”, who had a limited interest in many of the developments most associated with Quattrocento painting, such as the realistic depiction of human anatomy, perspective, and landscape, and the use of direct borrowings from classical art. His training enabled him to represent all these aspects of painting, without contributing to their development. Continue reading

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Showcase: Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec was a French painter, printmaker, draughtsman, caricaturist, and illustrator whose immersion in the colourful and theatrical life of Paris in the late 19th century allowed him to produce a collection of enticing, elegant, and provocative images of the modern, sometimes decadent, affairs of those times.

Selling Your Art Online: What to Do

There’s no doubt about it: we have divided our lives into two different parts – offline and online. And the online world provides just as many opportunities, maybe even more, than the offline.

Well, then it should make sense to also sell your art online, right?

It is possible. But can it be done?

Yes, of course.

Selling art online is not only possible, but more and more opportunities are being presented every few months. Art collectors have become more confident towards buying art from online sources, purchasing works without having to see them in person.

It’s an exciting time to be selling art online, and with a bit of creativity and employing various guerrilla marketing techniques, you can do without investing a lot of money in advertising and such.

But before you even think about selling your art online, it’s important to cover a few of the basics.

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Showcase: Edvard Munch

Norwegian painter Edvard Munch’s works can cause psychological trauma. Or are they depictions of such trauma? There’s something bizarre about them, and said works show how art is not about the outward appearance of things, but their inner complexities. What hides behind a smile? What can you figure out about a person from their body language? What is it about colors? Continue reading

Showcase: Pablo Picasso as a child

Pablo Picasso requires no introduction. Arguably the most famous painter in existence, his level of genius comparable to those of Salvador Dali or Jackson Pollock, the Spaniard created some fifty thousand artworks during his life.

“It took me four years to paint like Rafael, but a lifetime to paint like a child.”

Not bad for an eight year old, right? Continue reading

Showcase: Cindy Press

According to her website:

Cindy Press is a visual artist living and working in New York. She was born and raised in Philadelphia where she graduated with a BFA in Fashion Illustration from Moore College Of Art And Design.

“My original goal was to create paintings that are simply striking and beautiful, getting back to my roots of fashion illustration. As I started my process of reinvention I found myself drawn to images of women that are edgy and sexy. Collecting clippings from magazines and editorials as inspiration, I work in a semi-realistic manner depicting portraits and figures of females. When I begin to work I notice a peculiar shift in my thought process. I am no longer concerned about the beauty of the image but instead how it speaks to me, what does the expression or pose represent to me? My focus changes entirely as I consider a history of experiences while I paint. I think about my life, my family, and friends. The relationships, the love, the hurt, the anguish and my own personal conflicts come into play. There is so much more behind a person’s appearance. Through the cult of beauty in contemporary mass media I am investigating the psychological complexity of women.”

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