TMM: Sex and art

Life and art are incredibly close to one another. Almost identical, but not quite. Like a parallel dimension, like an alternate universe, art has always been the number one destination for those who cannot find a place in a certain society.

But art and sex? Well, that’s also the point of art. Art is sex, and sex is art.

Think about it.

Refuse to believe the self-imposed limitations of a society that is too afraid of its own nature. Feel it. Genuinely feel it.

Is art sex?

Is sex art?


Three books that steal your innocence

When I first started reading at the age of fourteen, I kind of lacked a proper selective criteria when it came to books. I read what was popular, when I found a certain title appealing, what my parents kept in their bookshelf. I read certain books because everyone was reading them, because I thought it would make me smarter, a better writer, or a better person. I read books because their covers were beautiful.

And somehow I stumbled upon the kind of books that are not everyone’s cup of tea. They’re rather like a shot of whiskey. Erotic, controversial, the kind of books that you can’t read in public. But you can’t help it, so you must find a quiet place and read. Continue reading

When the love stories of artists become the subject matter of a book

When you do your research and want to write about people you never met you undoubtedly end up writing about yourself. You fill in the cracks with personal stories, with your idea of who they were and how the thought, talked, or acted, so it is a real risk that the reader will end up reading about yourself.

As they say, all art is a self-portrait.

Reading the essays from Significant Others: Creativity & Intimate Partnership by Whitney Chadwick and Isabelle de Courtivron I got the impression of reading the typical art book: every artist was the very best, a creative genius, every love story unique, tragic, and influenced by said creative genius.  Continue reading

Relationship advice from 19th century novels

There’s no doubt about the fact that art influences the way we experience reality. In fact, art is so influential that it affects the way we understand reality. Literature, Hollywood flicks, advertising or pop songs change our perception of love and what to expect from our partners.

Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet was famously meant to be a parody of sorts. “These violent delights…” It is a cautionary tale as to how dangerous can be for us to idealize a romantic partner, how perilous it is to give up on everything for them. Yet people find the pair’s death as “romantic.”

Another example? The Great Gatsby. People upload quotes from this novel everywhere, as if the love story between Daisy and Gatsby is romance at its finest. It’s not. Daisy does not love him as much as he does her. Also, this so called “love” corrupts Gatsby to the point that he is nothing without her. Everything he does, it’s because of her.

Is this what we’d truly want from love? Is this what we understand by love?

But all this pales in comparison to the manner in which “love” was defined by 19th century novels. Let’s take a look at some of these novels and the way in which they define relationships. Continue reading