Showcase: from black and white to color

Ever wondered how your favorite artists from a hundred years ago would look in color? Continue reading


Showcase: Jean-Michel Basquiat

As part of SAMO, an informal graffiti duo who wrote enigmatic epigrams in the cultural hotbed of the Lower East Side of Manhattan during the late 1970s where the hip hop, post-punk, and street art movements had coalesced, Jean-Michel Basquiat managed to get the attention of many of the days artists, including Andy Warhol. His mixed art made use of poetry, drawing, and painting.  Continue reading


Showcase: Mario Arroyave

Mario Arroyave (Espinal, Colombia, 1983), his approach to photography begins at age 13 empirically and developed in the coming years as a Side project, while studying and working in systems engineering and advertising in Costa Rica and Colombia. In 2010 he starts a carrier as an artist, showcasing at the Warehouse Art Gallery opening. Nowadays is one of the leading Colombian young artists. His work have been shown in individual and collective exhibitions in Bogotá, Medellín, Lima, Sao Paulo, Miami, Dallas, New York, Tokyo, among others. Continue reading


Showcase: Francisco Goya

Francisco José de Goya y Lucientes was a Spanish romantic painter and printmaker, often considered to be the most important Spanish artist of the 18th century, the last of the Old Masters and the first of the moderns. I’d say he was one of the best artists to reveal the darkness that resides in our souls. All that is greedy and wrong with human nature. Continue reading


Showcase: Constantin Brancusi

Constantin Brancusi was a Romanian sculptor, painter and photographer who made his career in France. A pioneer of modernism, one of the most influential sculptors of the 20th-century, Brancusi is considered the patriarch of modern sculpture. Continue reading


Showcase: Kate Murray


“I was a troubled child, I didn’t fit in. I was subject to bullying, a social outcast. The kid who runs into the library at lunchtime because they have no one to talk to. That was me…”

“I didn’t learn to read until I was 11. But I could draw. I have always drawn. At first it was mice. I even sold them to classmates for pennies. Then I moved on to any animal and insect. I remember having a massive A2 sketchpad that was filled with huge drawings of spiders and centipedes. I drew everything. My school work was filled with lions and tigers, some eating, some drinking and others just staring out of the page. I’m guessing that my parents may have been asked to curb my enthusiasm, but how do you stop a child communicating when all they use are drawings?

Then at 11 I learnt to read. I learnt to write and I started to understand other artists. My artwork started to evolve and in many ways it still is. I’m still learning.

Why do I draw? Because it is a fundamental part of me. I wouldn’t be Kate without a canvas on the easel and an ink smudge on my hand. I draw every day. It is the same to me as breathing.
I exhibit as part of a group in Wales, Celf Canolbarth Cymru and although I haven’t had a solo exhibition yet I am hoping to soon…
” – Kate Murray


Showcase: Raffaele Marinetti

Raffaele Marinetti is a freelance illustrator and concept artist based in Naples (Italy), who creates digital paintings principally for private commissions but also for books, magazines covers, advertising, comic books etc. Continue reading